Upcoming Trainings

Webinar: Voter Rights, Privacy and Safety for Advocates and Survivors

 

Click HERE to register!

The right to vote is an essential part of using our voices and participating in our communities to promote our beliefs and values. For survivors, voting can be empowering and can create opportunity to address barriers to safety through policies and government representation. However, voting can create safety issues for survivors who are concerned about an abusive partner locating them through their voter registration record. Survivors also may have safety concerns around going in person to vote, waiting in long lines, or knowing their rights and successfully registering.

In this webinar, we will address privacy and voter registration, and the unique concerns that survivors may have. We’ll talk about how advocates can provide information, resources, and support in both registering to vote and either voting in person or via a mail-in ballot. We’ll also talk about how exercising our vote is a part of advocacy.

Presenters: Corbin Streett, Technology Safety Specialist with the Safety Net Project at the National Network to End Domestic Violence and Stephanie Ali with All Voting is Local

Intended Audience: Advocates and staff of domestic violence shelters and community-based programs in Georgia.

09/24/2020 02:30 PM

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"Arrested Justice" Virtual Reading Group, Session 3

We will be reading and discussing Arrested Justice: Black Women, Violence, and America’s Prison Nation by Beth Richie. The Reading Group is hosted by Jennifer Thomas, Director of Strategic Partnerships at CJCC, Stacey Seldon, Family Violence Coordinator at GCFV, and Alexis Champion, Training Manager at GCADV.

About Arrested Justice: Black women in marginalized communities are uniquely at risk of battering, rape, sexual harassment, stalking and incest. Through the compelling stories of Black women who have been most affected by racism, persistent poverty, class inequality, limited access to support resources or institutions, Beth E. Richie shows that the threat of violence to Black women has never been more serious, demonstrating how conservative legal, social, political and economic policies have impacted activism in the U.S.-based movement to end violence against women. 

Richie argues that Black women face particular peril because of the ways that race and culture have not figured centrally enough in the analysis of the causes and consequences of gender violence. As a result, the extent of physical, sexual and other forms of violence in the lives of Black women, the various forms it takes, and the contexts within which it occurs are minimized—at best—and frequently ignored. Arrested Justice brings issues of sexuality, class, age, and criminalization into focus right alongside of questions of public policy and gender violence, resulting in a compelling critique, a passionate re-framing of stories, and a call to action for change.

The virtual book club will be held via Zoom, in 3 sessions held over the next couple of months. We will discuss the book in three sections (approximately 85 pages each section), and we will provide discussion topics prior to the group convening. 

 

After registering, you will receive a separate email with discussion questions and the Zoom link to attend the session. 

10/01/2020 10:00 AM

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"Arrested Justice" Virtual Reading Group, Session 3

We will be reading and discussing Arrested Justice: Black Women, Violence, and America’s Prison Nation by Beth Richie. The Reading Group is hosted by Jennifer Thomas, Director of Strategic Partnerships at CJCC, Stacey Seldon, Family Violence Coordinator at GCFV, and Alexis Champion, Training Manager at GCADV.

About Arrested Justice: Black women in marginalized communities are uniquely at risk of battering, rape, sexual harassment, stalking and incest. Through the compelling stories of Black women who have been most affected by racism, persistent poverty, class inequality, limited access to support resources or institutions, Beth E. Richie shows that the threat of violence to Black women has never been more serious, demonstrating how conservative legal, social, political and economic policies have impacted activism in the U.S.-based movement to end violence against women. 

Richie argues that Black women face particular peril because of the ways that race and culture have not figured centrally enough in the analysis of the causes and consequences of gender violence. As a result, the extent of physical, sexual and other forms of violence in the lives of Black women, the various forms it takes, and the contexts within which it occurs are minimized—at best—and frequently ignored. Arrested Justice brings issues of sexuality, class, age, and criminalization into focus right alongside of questions of public policy and gender violence, resulting in a compelling critique, a passionate re-framing of stories, and a call to action for change.

The virtual book club will be held via Zoom, in 3 sessions held over the next couple of months. We will discuss the book in three sections (approximately 85 pages each section), and we will provide discussion topics prior to the group convening. 

 

After registering, you will receive a separate email with discussion questions and the Zoom link to attend the session. 

10/01/2020 12:30 PM

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